Courses - Fall 2021

STS 1101 Science, Technology, and Politics

From global warming to surveillance of citizens to health-care reform, issues in science, technology, and medicine are also political issues. This course uses contemporary scientific controversies to explore the intersections of science and politics. Issues explored may include the role of the military and private sector in funding research, the politics of experts and expertise, computer privacy and national security, and environmental politics.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Christine Leuenberger (cal22)
Full details for STS 1101 : Science, Technology, and Politics
STS 1123 FWS: Technology and Society Topics

This seminar explores the ways in which Technology and Society shape one another and provides the opportunity to write extensively about this mutual shaping. Topics vary by section.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Catherine Coyle (cmc569)
Full details for STS 1123 : FWS: Technology and Society Topics
STS 1126 FWS: Science and Society Topics

This seminar explores the ways in which Science and Society shape one another and provides the opportunity to write extensively about this mutual shaping. Topics vary by section.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Rebecca Harrison (rah288)
Full details for STS 1126 : FWS: Science and Society Topics
STS 1128 FWS: Planetary Health: Plagues, Pandemics, Extinctions

Americans often think of health as physician interactions at a bedside, pills procured at a pharmacy, reps done in the gym, or foods bought in a supermarket. But the COVID-19 pandemic began with a virus initially transmitted from a bat, a pangolin, or some other species. Climate change may increase the frequency of global pandemics. Further, two centuries of industrial production have made life easy for many humans while impoverishing and immiserating many more. Many communities, often communities of color, have suffered disproportionate effects of toxins leached into water supplies and absorbed into crops. The planet is facing mass extinctions caused by human activities. This course examines the meeting of health and environment. It starts with the COVID-19 pandemic, which has exposed the cracks in US society, including the US health system. It also considers contamination of the water in Flint, Michigan, and other examples that reveal the vital linkage between health and environment. 

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Rachel Prentice (rep35)
Full details for STS 1128 : FWS: Planetary Health: Plagues, Pandemics, Extinctions
STS 1180 Evolution

Evolution is the central concept in biology. This course examines evolution as a science and places it in an historical context. Classes focus on descent with modification, the nature of natural selection, the history of the earth, the information content of the fossil record, and processes responsible for diversification (speciation and extinction). The science of evolutionary biology is presented in the context of a broader history of ideas in science. The course also explores the importance of evolutionary thinking in the 21st century, including discussion of antibiotic and pesticide resistance, personalized genomics, eugenics, and climate change.

Distribution: (PBS-AS, BIO-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Ashley Heim (abh229)
Kelly Schmid (kms477)
Full details for STS 1180 : Evolution
STS 2051 Ethical Issues in Health and Medicine

In the rapidly changing world of healthcare, complex ethical issues arise from interpersonal interactions between patients and clinicians to broad controversies that propel medicine into headline news.  This course will examine ethical challenges in contemporary medicine, healthcare, and biomedical research from the bedside to health policy.  Using case-vignettes, news stories, narratives, and readings from the healthcare, ethics, and social science literature we will examine issues from multiple vantage points. A range of topics will be explored including the patient-clinician relationship, heath care decision-making, issues at the beginning and end-of-life, technological advances, human experimentation, healthcare systems, and distributive justice. The course will also examine the fluidity of normative ethical boundaries, and how context and point of reference influence our perceptions of and approach to ethical issues. 

Distribution: (KCM-AS, ETM-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Kim Overby (kjo46)
Full details for STS 2051 : Ethical Issues in Health and Medicine
STS 2381 Ten Technologies That Shook the World?

In 1919, journalist John Reed published Ten Days That Shook the World about the 1917 Russian Revolution. Some events are so transformative, Reed argued, they change the course of history. This class examines ten technologies that "shook" the world over the past half millennium. Or did they? Can technology drive history? How should we think about the relationship between technology and culture, society, politics, and the environment? This course challenges many popular understandings of technology and technological change, introducing students to major concepts in the history and social studies of technology, including technological determinism, systems, infrastructure, skill, technopolitics, envirotech, users, and maintenance and repair. Technologies addressed will vary, but may include the slave ship, factory, climate control, atomic bomb, and plastic.  

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Sara Pritchard (sbp65)
Full details for STS 2381 : Ten Technologies That Shook the World?
STS 2451 Introduction to Bioethics

Bioethics is the study of ethical questions raised by advances in the medical field.  Questions we'll discuss will include:  Is it morally permissible to advance a patient's death, at his or her request, to reduce suffering?  Is there a moral difference between killing someone and letting someone die?  What ethical issues are raised by advance care planning?  What is it to die?  What forms of cognitive decline or physical change could you survive (and still be you)?  On the flip side, were you ever a fetus?  How should the rights of pregnant women be balanced against those of the fetus?  Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children?  Are some forms of human enhancement morally troubling?  Should we aim to be better than well?  What is it to be disabled?  How should scarce health care resources or costly therapies be allocated to those in need?  Should organ sales be permitted?  Should medical treatment (or health insurance!) ever be compulsory, or is mandating treatment unacceptably paternalistic?  Should doctors or hospitals be permitted to refuse to provide certain medical services that violate their consciences?

Distribution: (KCM-AS, ETM-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Julia Markovits (jm2476)
Full details for STS 2451 : Introduction to Bioethics
STS 2643 The Birth of Science: Discovering the World from Antiquity to Today

What can Aristotle, Archimedes, Hippocrates and other ancient scientists teach us about science as we know it today? In this course we will study the origins of scientific thought and experiment in mathematics, biology, medicine, astronomy and more in the ancient Mediterranean, comparing them to modern approaches as well as examples from classical China, the medieval Islamic world, Mesoamerica, and Africa. We will discuss questions about the philosophy of science and its socio-historical context and engage actively with ancient problem-solving methods.

Distribution: (LA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Courtney Roby (car295)
Full details for STS 2643 : The Birth of Science: Discovering the World from Antiquity to Today
STS 2921 Inventing an Information Society

Provides an introduction to the role computing and information technologies played in political public life, from tabulating machines used to calculate the census to Big Tech's impact on democratic procedures, the future of labor, and the environment. Though organized around four thematic units (Recognizing and Representing, Knowing, Working, and Belonging), the course pays attention to the chronological trajectory of technologies and political practices and students will develop the skills necessary for historical analysis. While focusing on the US experience the course also highlights the international flow of labor, materials, and ideas. By studying the development of computing historically, we will grapple with the effects of computing and data sciences on society today, paying special attention to critiques of economic, racial, and gender injustice. The course will meet twice a week, and each meeting will include a lecture followed by a discussion.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Gili Vidan (gv232)
Full details for STS 2921 : Inventing an Information Society
STS 3011 Life Sciences and Society

Biology and biotechnology are major influences on modern life. In addition, socio-political and historical conditions have shaped biological research and its applications in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, etc. Life science research is itself a social process involving complex human dynamics, different kinds of work and an array of social and natural systems. The course aims to introduce students to critical science and technology studies (S&TS) perspectives on the knowledge and practices of life sciences. The course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in the Biology & Society and S&TS majors, but students who do not plan to take further courses in those subjects can get critical insight into biology's profound role in both science and society.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jessica Ratcliff (jrr47)
Full details for STS 3011 : Life Sciences and Society
STS 3020 Science Writing for the Media

How to write about science, technology, and medicine for the media. Writing assignments focus on writing news for web sites, blogs, magazines, and other media.

Distribution: (SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Danielle Eiseman (dle58)
Full details for STS 3020 : Science Writing for the Media
STS 3111 Sociology of Medicine

This course provides an introduction to the ways in which medical practice, the medical profession, and medical technology are embedded in society and culture. We will ask how medicine is connected to various sociocultural factors such as gender, social class, race, and administrative cultures. We will examine the rise of medical sociology as a discipline, the professionalization of medicine, and processes of medicalization and demedicalization. We will look at alternative medical practices and how they differ from and converge with the dominant medical paradigm. We will focus on the rise of medical technology in clinical practice with a special emphases on reproductive technologies. We will focus on the body as a site for medical knowledge, including the medicalization of sex differences, the effect of culture on nutrition, and eating disorders such as obesity and anorexia nervosa. We will also read various classic and contemporary texts that speak to the illness experience and the culture of surgeons, hospitals, and patients, and we will discuss various case studies in the social construction of physical and mental illness.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Christine Leuenberger (cal22)
Full details for STS 3111 : Sociology of Medicine
STS 3231 Global Health Security and Diplomacy

This course analyzes the development of foreign policy at the nexus of global health and national security in an attempt to better define and understand the evolving concept of "Global Health Security and Diplomacy". Interdisciplinary in nature, the course covers a broad set of themes and their intersection, including science and technology policy, biodefense and counter terrorism, gender disparity and development, nonproliferation, food security, global health, and U.S. diplomacy. Emphasis is placed on the current U.S. administration's efforts to advance a national security and foreign policy agenda inclusive of global grand challenges. We will also pay particular attention to understanding to the role of non-governmental organizations in global health security.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, GLC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jason Rao (jr797)
Full details for STS 3231 : Global Health Security and Diplomacy
STS 3311 Environmental Governance

Environmental governance is defined as the assemblage of institutions that regulate society-nature interactions and shape environmental outcomes across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Institutions, broadly defined, are mechanisms of social coordination including laws (formal) and social norms (informal) that guide the behavior of individuals. Participants in the course will explore the roles of governments, markets, and collective action in environmental management and mismanagement. We will emphasize interactions among leading environmental policy strategies: public regulation, market-based incentives, and community-based resource management. The course is focused around a set of analytic perspectives. These theoretical frameworks allow us to synthesize empirical observations and material changes in ways that inform our understanding of contemporary evolution of environmental policy and management.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Steven Wolf (saw44)
Full details for STS 3311 : Environmental Governance
STS 3440 Data Science and Society Lab

The next generation of thinkers will need a firm grasp on the practices and values implicated in designing and using data science tools. The class will sensitize students from the social sciences, humanities, and STEM to the complexities of data science as both a social and a technical project. We will conduct group research, mapping data flows and frictions within the university while engaging in critical discussion about our findings at Cornell and what we see in the larger social world. Through this immersive and hands-on learning experience: we will lay the groundwork for future coursework and critical engagement with data science, examine data science concepts, track the expansion of data science into several areas of daily life, and engage in social, ethical, and policy analysis.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Malte Ziewitz (mcz35)
Full details for STS 3440 : Data Science and Society Lab
STS 3474 Infrastructure

Infrastructure! It's the hardware and software that undergirds transportation, energy, water, and security systems. This course asks what we can learn about infrastructure when we approach it not as a neutral set of technologies but as a context-dependent social and political force. Taking a critical approach to (among others) natural resources, labor, housing, and security, the course will trace how infrastructures have both served and obstructed colonial and contemporary projects for social change.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Alex Nading (amn242)
Full details for STS 3474 : Infrastructure
STS 3650 History and Theory of Digital Art

In this course, we will examine the role of mechanical, electronic and digital technologies in the arts of the late 20th and 21st centuries with emphasis on Europe and North America. Beginning with kinetic art and the cybernetically inspired work of the late sixties, we will explore early uses of computer technology, including early experiments in synthetic video in the 1970s. An overview of pre-internet telematic experiments will lead to an investigation of net art and later currents of digital art. The ongoing development of behavioral art forms will be a central theme. Critical evaluation of various attitudes concerning technology will be encouraged.

Distribution: (CA-AS, ALC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Maria Fernandez (mf252)
Full details for STS 3650 : History and Theory of Digital Art
STS 3991 Undergraduate Independent Study

Applications for research projects are accepted by individual STS faculty members. Students may enroll for 1–4 credits in STS 3991 with written permission of the faculty supervisor and may elect either the letter grade or the S–U option. Information on faculty research, scholarly activities, and undergraduate opportunities are available in the Science & Technology Studies office, 303 Morrill Hall. Independent study credits may not be used in completion of the major requirements.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Stephen Hilgartner (shh6)
Full details for STS 3991 : Undergraduate Independent Study
STS 4041 Controversies in Science, Technology and Medicine: What They Are and How to Study Them

Scientists and medical researchers try to avoid controversy whilst STS scholars argue that controversy can be a motor of scientific and medical change. There is a lengthy tradition of research into different forms of controversies within science, technology, and medicine. We will read selectively and discuss critically this literature particularly focusing upon controversies in medicine. Controversies we will examine include, how best to run clinical trials, alternative medicine, anti-vaxxers and the role of patients in developing new disease categories. We will also look at the ethics of carrying out medical research on the incarcerated and other disadvantaged groups. We will cover historical cases as well as contemporary ones.  Students will critically evaluate the main analytical approaches towards controversies and will choose one controversy to focus upon in their final paper. 

Distribution: (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Trevor Pinch (tjp2)
Full details for STS 4041 : Controversies in Science, Technology and Medicine: What They Are and How to Study Them
STS 4101 The Entangled Lives of Humans and Animals

One animal behaviorist speculates that big brains develop when species are social; that is, when they must read cues from members of their group to understand when to approach, when to flee, when to fight, when to care. This course looks not only at animals in their social lives, but also at animals in their lives with us. We ask questions about how species become entangled and what that means for both parties, about the social lives of animals independently and with humans, about the survival of human and animal species, and about what it means to use animals for science, food, and profit. The course draws on readings from Anthropology, Science & Technology Studies, and animal trainers and behaviorists.

Distribution: (KCM-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Rachel Prentice (rep35)
Full details for STS 4101 : The Entangled Lives of Humans and Animals
STS 4240 Designing Technology for Social Impact

The social impact of technologies is typically thought about fairly late, if ever, in the design process. Indeed, it can be difficult at design time to predict what effects technologies will have. Nevertheless, design decisions can inadvertently "lock in" particular values early on. In this course, we will draw on science & technology studies, technology design, and the arts to analyze the values embodied in technology design and to design technologies to promote positive social impact. What social and cultural values do technology designs consciously or unconsciously promote? To what degree can social impact be "built into" a technology? How can we take social and cultural values into account in design?

Distribution: (CA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Christopher Csikszentmihalyi (cpc83)
Full details for STS 4240 : Designing Technology for Social Impact
STS 4416 It's the End of the World As We Know It

Living in the contemporary moment means living with reminders that the end of the world – at least as we know it – is looming. From the global ecological crisis to evangelical apocalyptic visions, and from nuclear threats to the changes wrought by automated work, people are brushing up against the limits of human knowledge and experience. In this course, we will consider how anthropologists have grappled with the end of the world, drawing the discipline's boundaries liberally. Working with ethnography, science fiction, film, and more, we will ask: What does it mean to adopt the uncertain future as an object of study? And might the end of the world as we know it also mean the start of a more speculative anthropology?

Distribution: (CA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Chloe Ahmann (cak272)
Full details for STS 4416 : It's the End of the World As We Know It
STS 4991 Honors Project I

Students must register for 4 credits each semester (4991-4992) for a total of 8 credits. After the first semester, students receive a letter grade of "R"; a letter grade for both semesters is submitted at the end of the second semester whether or not the student completes a thesis or is recommended for honors. Minimally, an honors thesis outline and bibliography should be completed during the first semester. In consultation with the advisors, the director of undergraduate studies will evaluate whether the student should continue working on an honors project. Students should note that these courses are to be taken in addition to those courses that meet the regular major requirements. If students do not complete the second semester of the honors project, they must change the first semester to independent study to clear the "R" and receive a grade. Otherwise, the "R" will remain on their record and prevent them from graduating.

Academic Career: UG Full details for STS 4991 : Honors Project I
STS 6181 Confluence: Environmental History and Science and Technology Studies

This course uses water to examine the confluence of two fields: environmental history and the social and historical studies of science and technology. Although preliminary scholarship has begun to demonstrate the fruitful integration of these fields, a number of methodological and theoretical tensions remain. Some of these tensions include the social construction of "nature," nature as a historical actor, accounts of the emergence of "environmental" "problems," constructivist models of science and technology, and scholars' use of technoscientific sources to assess environmental change. This class, therefore, examines a number of scholarly debates about key terms, definitions, and categories (both historical actors' and analysts'), knowledge-making about "nature" and human interactions with nonhuman nature, and the concept of agency. Weekly seminars are organized around readings in environmental history, science studies, and/or their intersection that explore these issues in diverse ways while usually addressing various aquatic environments in comparative historical and cultural perspective.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Sara Pritchard (sbp65)
Full details for STS 6181 : Confluence: Environmental History and Science and Technology Studies
STS 6321 Inside Technology

Rather than analyze the social impact of technology upon society, this course investigates how society gets inside technology. In other words, is it possible that the very design of technologies embody assumptions about the nature of society? And, if so, are alternative technologies, which embody different assumptions about society, possible? Do engineers have implicit theories about society? Is technology gendered? How can we understand the interaction of society and technology? Throughout the course the arguments are illustrated by detailed examinations of particular technologies, such as the ballistic missile, the bicycle, the electric car, and the refrigerator.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Trevor Pinch (tjp2)
Full details for STS 6321 : Inside Technology
STS 6460 Bodies and Bodiliness

In this graduate level course, we will take the body and bodiliness as spaces of ethnographic engagement and questioning. Discussion, text and other materials in this class will invite students to consider the ways that "the body" (as an epistemological and ontological object) is transformed through a variety of scientific, economic and political projects. Because meditations on the body have rested -- implicitly or explicitly -- on theoretical and methodological approaches to experience, students will find themselves exploring histories of bodily senses, appetites, and capacities. Ultimately, our inquiry into contests over and reflections on "the body" and "bodiliness" aim to open up broader anthropological questions about knowledge, authority, agency, sovereignties, and material life.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Stacey Langwick (sal54)
Full details for STS 6460 : Bodies and Bodiliness
STS 6474 Infrastructure

Infrastructure! It's the hardware and software that undergirds transportation, energy, water, and security systems. This course asks what we can learn about infrastructure when we approach it not as a neutral set of technologies but as a context-dependent social and political force. Taking a critical approach to (among others) natural resources, labor, housing, and security, the course will trace how infrastructures have both served and obstructed colonial and contemporary projects for social change.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Alex Nading (amn242)
Full details for STS 6474 : Infrastructure
STS 6661 Public Engagement in Science

In recent years, the scientific community has increasingly referred to "public engagement in science." This seminar explores the scholarly literature addressing that move; the links between "public engagement" and earlier concerns about sciences literacy, public understanding of science, and outreach; and the intersections between literature in communication and in science studies on issues involving the relationships among science(s) and public(s).

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Bruce Lewenstein (bvl1)
Full details for STS 6661 : Public Engagement in Science
STS 6991 Graduate Independent Study

Applications and information are available in 303 Morrill Hall.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Peter Dear (prd3)
Full details for STS 6991 : Graduate Independent Study
STS 7005 STS Perspectives

This one-credit seminar is designed to introduce PhD students in Science & Technology Studies (STS) to the faculty in the STS graduate field and their scholarly interests and work. Faculty members will be invited to lead one week of the course during the fall semester. Course leaders will set the agenda for their week (e.g., discussing a reading of their choice, introducing their research agenda, or discussing emerging issues the field). Reading assignments will be minimal; no more than 40 pages each week.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Sara Pritchard (sbp65)
Full details for STS 7005 : STS Perspectives
STS 7111 Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Provides students with a foundation in the field of science and technology studies. Using classic works as well as contemporary exemplars, seminar participants chart the terrain of this new field. Topics for discussion include, but are not limited to, historiography of science and technology and their relation to social studies of science and technology, laboratory studies, intellectual property, science and the state, the role of instruments, fieldwork, politics and technical knowledge, philosophy of science, sociological studies of science and technology, and popularization.

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Juno Parrenas (jsp324)
Suman Seth (ss536)
Full details for STS 7111 : Introduction to Science and Technology Studies
STS 7416 It's the End of the World As We Know It

Living in the contemporary moment means living with reminders that the end of the world – at least as we know it – is looming. From the global ecological crisis to evangelical apocalyptic visions, and from nuclear threats to the changes wrought by automated work, people are brushing up against the limits of human knowledge and experience. In this course, we will consider how anthropologists have grappled with the end of the world, drawing the discipline's boundaries liberally. Working with ethnography, science fiction, film, and more, we will ask: What does it mean to adopt the uncertain future as an object of study? And might the end of the world as we know it also mean the start of a more speculative anthropology?

Academic Career: GR Instructor: Chloe Ahmann (cak272)
Full details for STS 7416 : It's the End of the World As We Know It
BSOC 2051 Ethical Issues in Health and Medicine

In the rapidly changing world of healthcare, complex ethical issues arise from interpersonal interactions between patients and clinicians to broad controversies that propel medicine into headline news.  This course will examine ethical challenges in contemporary medicine, healthcare, and biomedical research from the bedside to health policy.  Using case-vignettes, news stories, narratives, and readings from the healthcare, ethics, and social science literature we will examine issues from multiple vantage points. A range of topics will be explored including the patient-clinician relationship, heath care decision-making, issues at the beginning and end-of-life, technological advances, human experimentation, healthcare systems, and distributive justice. The course will also examine the fluidity of normative ethical boundaries, and how context and point of reference influence our perceptions of and approach to ethical issues. 

Distribution: (KCM-AS, ETM-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Kim Overby (kjo46)
Full details for BSOC 2051 : Ethical Issues in Health and Medicine
BSOC 2101 Plagues and People

Human diseases have affected human lives and society through history. This course focuses on the pathogens, parasites, and arthropods causing human plagues through multiple perspectives (biomedical, social, ethical, cultural). Those plagues that have had the greatest impact on human culture and expression are emphasized. Lectures are supplemented with readings, videos and discussions. Also addresses emerging diseases, bioterrorism, and future plagues. Students taking the course for 3 credits participate in one discussion session each week and may do a comprehensive final project rather than a final exam.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Marina Caillaud (cmc27)
Laura Harrington (lch27)
Full details for BSOC 2101 : Plagues and People
BSOC 2245 Health and Disease in the Ancient World

The history of humankind is also a history of health and disease; the rise of agricultural societies, ancient cities, and colonial empires had wide-ranging effects on diet and nutrition, the spread of infectious diseases, and occurrence of other health conditions. This history has also been shaped by complex interactions between environment, technology, and society. Using archaeological, environmental, textual, and skeletal evidence, we will survey major epidemiological transitions from the Paleolithic to the age of European conquest. We will also examine diverse cultural experiences of health, illness, and the body. How do medical practices from pre-modern societies, such as the medieval Islamic world and the Inca Empire, challenge dominant narratives of scientific development? The implications of past health patterns for modern-day communities will also be explored.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Matthew Velasco (mcv47)
Full details for BSOC 2245 : Health and Disease in the Ancient World
BSOC 2420 Nature-Culture: Ethnographic Approaches to Human Environment Relations

One of the most pressing questions of our time is how we should understand the relationship between nature, or the environment, and culture, or society, and whether these should be viewed as separate domains at all. How one answers this question has important implications for how we go about thinking and acting in such diverse social arenas as environmental politics, development, and indigenous-state relations. This course serves as an introduction to the various ways anthropologists and other scholars have conceptualized the relationship between humans and the environment and considers the material and political consequences that flow from these conceptualizations.

Distribution: (CA-AS, GLC-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Paul Nadasdy (pn79)
Full details for BSOC 2420 : Nature-Culture: Ethnographic Approaches to Human Environment Relations
BSOC 3011 Life Sciences and Society

Biology and biotechnology are major influences on modern life. In addition, socio-political and historical conditions have shaped biological research and its applications in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, etc. Life science research is itself a social process involving complex human dynamics, different kinds of work and an array of social and natural systems. The course aims to introduce students to critical science and technology studies (S&TS) perspectives on the knowledge and practices of life sciences. The course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in the Biology & Society and S&TS majors, but students who do not plan to take further courses in those subjects can get critical insight into biology's profound role in both science and society.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jessica Ratcliff (jrr47)
Full details for BSOC 3011 : Life Sciences and Society
BSOC 3111 Sociology of Medicine

This course provides an introduction to the ways in which medical practice, the medical profession, and medical technology are embedded in society and culture. We will ask how medicine is connected to various sociocultural factors such as gender, social class, race, and administrative cultures. We will examine the rise of medical sociology as a discipline, the professionalization of medicine, and processes of medicalization and demedicalization. We will look at alternative medical practices and how they differ from and converge with the dominant medical paradigm. We will focus on the rise of medical technology in clinical practice with a special emphases on reproductive technologies. We will focus on the body as a site for medical knowledge, including the medicalization of sex differences, the effect of culture on nutrition, and eating disorders such as obesity and anorexia nervosa. We will also read various classic and contemporary texts that speak to the illness experience and the culture of surgeons, hospitals, and patients, and we will discuss various case studies in the social construction of physical and mental illness.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Christine Leuenberger (cal22)
Full details for BSOC 3111 : Sociology of Medicine
BSOC 3231 Global Health Security and Diplomacy

This course analyzes the development of foreign policy at the nexus of global health and national security in an attempt to better define and understand the evolving concept of "Global Health Security and Diplomacy". Interdisciplinary in nature, the course covers a broad set of themes and their intersection, including science and technology policy, biodefense and counter terrorism, gender disparity and development, nonproliferation, food security, global health, and U.S. diplomacy. Emphasis is placed on the current U.S. administration's efforts to advance a national security and foreign policy agenda inclusive of global grand challenges. We will also pay particular attention to understanding to the role of non-governmental organizations in global health security.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, GLC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Jason Rao (jr797)
Full details for BSOC 3231 : Global Health Security and Diplomacy
BSOC 3311 Environmental Governance

Environmental governance is defined as the assemblage of institutions that regulate society-nature interactions and shape environmental outcomes across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Institutions, broadly defined, are mechanisms of social coordination including laws (formal) and social norms (informal) that guide the behavior of individuals. Participants in the course will explore the roles of governments, markets, and collective action in environmental management and mismanagement. We will emphasize interactions among leading environmental policy strategies: public regulation, market-based incentives, and community-based resource management. The course is focused around a set of analytic perspectives. These theoretical frameworks allow us to synthesize empirical observations and material changes in ways that inform our understanding of contemporary evolution of environmental policy and management.

Distribution: (SBA-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Steven Wolf (saw44)
Full details for BSOC 3311 : Environmental Governance
BSOC 3441 Insect Conservation Biology

In-depth look at the concepts and issues surrounding the conservation of insects and other invertebrates. Topics include sampling rare populations; insect conservation genetics; the role of phylogeny in determining conservation priorities; refuge design; saving individual species; plus the unique political, social, and ethical aspects of insect conservation and preservation of their ecological services (i.e., pollination, decomposition, pest suppression, and insectivore food sources).

Academic Career: UG Instructor: John Losey (jel27)
Full details for BSOC 3441 : Insect Conservation Biology
BSOC 3751 Independent Study

Projects under the direction of a Biology and Society faculty member are encouraged as part of the program of study within the student's concentration area. Applications for research projects are accepted by individual faculty members. Students may enroll for 1 to 4 credits in BSOC 3751 Independent Study with written permission of the faculty supervisor and may elect either the letter grade or the S-U option. Students may elect to do an independent study project as an alternative to, or in advance of, an honors project. Information on faculty research, scholarly activities, and undergraduate opportunities are available in the Biology and Society Office, 303 Morrill Hall. Independent study credits may not be used in completion of the major requirements.

Academic Career: UG Instructor: Stephen Hilgartner (shh6)
Full details for BSOC 3751 : Independent Study
BSOC 4101 The Entangled Lives of Humans and Animals

One animal behaviorist speculates that big brains develop when species are social; that is, when they must read cues from members of their group to understand when to approach, when to flee, when to fight, when to care. This course looks not only at animals in their social lives, but also at animals in their lives with us. We ask questions about how species become entangled and what that means for both parties, about the social lives of animals independently and with humans, about the survival of human and animal species, and about what it means to use animals for science, food, and profit. The course draws on readings from Anthropology, Science & Technology Studies, and animal trainers and behaviorists.

Distribution: (KCM-AS, SSC-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Rachel Prentice (rep35)
Full details for BSOC 4101 : The Entangled Lives of Humans and Animals
BSOC 4127 The Body Politic in Asia

Visions of bodily corruption preoccupy ruler and ruled alike and prompt campaigns for moral, medical, and legal reform in periods of both stability and revolution. This seminar explores the links between political, sexual, and scientific revolutions in early modern and modern Asia. The focus is on China and Japan, with secondary attention to South Asia and Korea. Interaction with the West is a major theme. Topics include disease control, birth control and population control, body modification, the history of masculinity, honorific violence and sexual violence, the science of sex, normative and stigmatized sexualities, fashion, disability, and eugenics. The course begins with an exploration of regimes of the body in "traditional" Asian cultures. The course then turns to the medicalization and modernization of the body under the major rival political movements in Asia: feminism, imperialism, nationalism, and communism.

Distribution: (HA-AS, HST-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Kristin Roebuck (kar79)
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BSOC 4227 Embodiment of Inequality: A Bioarchaeological Perspective

Critical approaches to embodiment compel bioarchaeologists to consider how social norms and institutional inequalities are enacted and materialized through the body. This course contributes a deep archaeological perspective on the lived experience of inequality and the historically contingent nature of sexuality, gender, and violence. Drawing upon the study of human skeletons, social theory, and a rich comparative literature in cultural anthropology, we will theorize bones as once-living bodies and explore topics such as body modification and mutilation, masculinity and performative violence, gender and sexual fluidity, and sickness and suffering in past societies. We will not only consider privilege and marginalization in lived experience, but also in death, examining how unequal social relationships are reproduced when the dead body is colonized as an object of study.

Distribution: (CA-AS, SCD-AS)
Academic Career: UG Instructor: Matthew Velasco (mcv47)
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BSOC 4991 Honors Project I

Students must register for 4 credits each semester (4991-4992) for a total of 8 credits. After the first semester, students receive a letter grade of "R"; a letter grade for both semesters is submitted at the end of the second semester whether or not the student completes a thesis or is recommended for honors. Minimally, an honors thesis outline and bibliography should be completed during the first semester. In consultation with the advisors, the director of undergraduate studies will evaluate whether the student should continue working on an honors project. Students should note that these courses are to be taken in addition to those courses that meet the regular major requirements. If students do not complete the second semester of the honors project, they must change the first semester to independent study to clear the "R" and receive a grade. Otherwise, the "R" will remain on their record and prevent them from graduating.

Academic Career: UG Full details for BSOC 4991 : Honors Project I