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STS 1102 : Histories of the Future
Crosslisted as: HIST 1620 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
From Frankenstein to The Matrix, science fiction and film have depicted contemporary science, technology, and medicine for almost two centuries. This course introduces students to historical and social studies of science and technology using science-fiction films and novels, as well as key readings in science and technology studies. What social questions can fictional accounts raise that factual ones can only anticipate? How have "intelligent machines" from Babbage's Analytical Engine to Hal raised questions about what it means to be human? What can Marvel Comics teach us about changes in science and technology? When can robots be women and, in general, what roles did gender play in scientific, technological, and medical stories? How was the discovery that one could look inside the human body received? How do dreams and nightmares of the future emerge from the everyday work of scientific and technological research?
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STS 1123 : FWS: Technology and Society Topics
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar explores the ways in which Technology and Society shape one another and provides the opportunity to write extensively about this mutual shaping. Topics vary by section.
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STS 1126 : FWS: Science and Society Topics
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar explores the ways in which Science and Society shape one another and provides the opportunity to write extensively about this mutual shaping. Topics vary by section.
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STS 1201 : Information Ethics, Law, and Policy
Crosslisted as: INFO 1200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course investigates the ethical, legal, and social foundations of information. Through lectures, readings, and independent projects, the class will learn to analyze and engage key challenges ranging from privacy in big data and ubiquitous computing environments, to the nature of property, organization, collaboration, and innovation in an increasingly networked world. With cases drawn from the fields of science, health care, education, politics, culture, and international development, and theories and methods from across the humanities and social sciences (law, philosophy, cultural studies, sociology, organizations, and several others) this course will teach students to engage critically and strategically with the worlds of information and technology around them.
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STS 2061 : Ethics and the Environment
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2061, PHIL 2460 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Politicians, scientists, and citizens worldwide face many environmental issues today, but they are neither simple nor straightforward. Moreover, there are many ways to understand how we have, do, and could value the environment from animal rights and wise use to deep ecology and ecofeminism. This class acquaints students with some of the challenging moral issues that arise in the context of environmental management and policy-making, both in the past and the present. Environmental concerns also highlight important economic, epistemological, legal, political, and social issues in assessing our moral obligations to nature as well as other humans. This course examines various perspectives expressed in both contemporary and historical debates over environmental ethics by exploring four central questions: What is nature? Who counts in environmental ethics? How do we know nature? Whose nature?
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BSOC 2201 : Society and Natural Resources
Crosslisted as: DSOC 2201, NTRES 2201 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The actions of people are crucial to environmental well-being. This course addresses the interrelationships between social phenomena and the natural (i.e., biophysical) environment. It is intended to (1) increase student awareness of these interconnections in their everyday lives; (2) introduce students to a variety of social science perspectives, including sociology, economics, psychology, and political science, that help us make sense of these connections; (3) identify the contributions of each of these perspectives to our understanding of environmental problems; and (4) discuss how natural resource management and environmental policy reflect these perspectives.
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STS 2468 : Medicine, Culture, and Society
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2468, BSOC 2468, FGSS 2468 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Medicine has become the language and practice through which we address a broad range of both individual and societal complaints. Interest in this "medicalization of life" may be one of the reasons that medical anthropology is currently the fastest-growing subfield in anthropology. This course encourages students to examine concepts of disease, suffering, health, and well-being in their immediate experience and beyond. In the process, students will gain a working knowledge of ecological, critical, phenomenological, and applied approaches used by medical anthropologists. We will investigate what is involved in becoming a doctor, the sociality of medicines, controversies over new medical technologies, and the politics of medical knowledge. The universality of biomedicine (or hospital medicine) will not be taken for granted, but rather we will examine the plurality generated by the various political, economic, social, and ethical demands under which biomedicine has developed in different places and at different times. In addition, biomedical healing and expertise will be viewed in relation to other kinds of healing and expertise. Our readings will address medicine in North America as well as other parts of the world. In class, our discussions will return regularly to consider the broad diversity of kinds of medicine throughout the world, as well as the specific historical and local contexts of biomedicine.
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STS 2561 : Medicine and Healing in China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2262, BSOC 2561, CAPS 2262, HIST 2562 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An exploration of processes of change in health care practices in China. Focuses on key transitions, such as the emergence of canonical medicine, of Daoist approaches to healing and longevity, of "scholar physicians," and of "traditional Chinese medicine" in modern China.  Inquiries into the development of healing practices in relation to both popular and specialist views of the body and disease; health care as organized by individuals, families, communities, and states; the transmission of medical knowledge; and healer-patient relations. Course readings include primary texts in translation as well as secondary materials. 
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BSOC 2581 : Environmental History
Crosslisted as: AMST 2581, HIST 2581 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This lecture course serves as an introduction to the historical study of humanity's interrelationship with the natural world. Environmental history is a quickly evolving field, taking on increasing importance as the environment itself becomes increasingly important in world affairs. During this semester, we'll examine the sometimes unexpected ways in which "natural" forces have shaped human history (the role of germs, for instance, in the colonization of North America); the ways in which human beings have shaped the natural world (through agriculture, urbanization, and industrialization, as well as the formation of things like wildlife preserves); and the ways in which cultural, scientific, political, and philosophical attitudes toward the environment have changed over time. This is designed as an intensely interdisciplinary course: we'll view history through the lenses of ecology, literature, art, film, law, anthropology, and geography. Our focus will be on the United States, but, just as environmental pollutants cross borders, so too will this class, especially toward the end, when we attempt to put U.S. environmental history into a geopolitical context. This course is meant to be open to all, including non-majors and first-year students.
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STS 2621 : Gendering Religion, Science and Technology
Crosslisted as: AMST 2621, FGSS 2621 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
There are several "just-so stories" about science and religion: the world's religions are parallel systems of belief in the supernatural; science has a set method that produces universal truths; and religion and science are in perpetual conflict. This course will challenge these understandings by introducing students to the study of religion, science, and technology, as well as to ways to think about their relationships. To bring these categories down to earth and unsettle engrained scholarly and popular narratives, our approach will be to gender the study of religion, science, and technology. To do so, we will not simply "add women and stir," to borrow a phrase from feminist historians; rather, we will query how gender, sexuality, and embodiment shape the very construction of knowledge itself.
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STS 2841 : Viruses- Humans-Viral Politics (Social History and Cultural Politics of HIV & AIDS)
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2021, BSOC 2841, FGSS 2841, LGBT 2841 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores what has been termed "the modern plague."  It investigates the social history, cultural politics, biological processes, and global impacts of the retrovirus, HIV, and the disease syndrome, AIDS. It engages material from multiple fields: life sciences, social sciences, & humanities as well as media reports, government documents, activist art, and community-based documentaries. It explores various meanings and life-experiences of HIV & AIDS; examines conflicting understandings of health, disease, the body; investigates political struggles over scientific research, biomedical & public health interventions, and cultural representations; and queries how HIV vulnerability is shaped by systems of power and inequality. As well, we come to learn about the practices, the politics, and the ethics of life and care that arise in "the age of epidemic."
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STS 2851 : Communication, Environment, Science, and Health
Crosslisted as: COMM 2850 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Environmental problems, public health issues, scientific research-in each of these areas, communication plays a fundamental role. From the media to individual conversations, from technical journals to textbooks, from lab notes to the web, communication helps define scientifically based social issues and research findings. This course examines the institutional and intellectual contexts, processes, and practical constraints on communication in the sciences.
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STS 3111 : Sociology of Medicine
Crosslisted as: BSOC 3111, DSOC 3111, SOC 3130 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course provides an introduction to the ways in which medical practice, the medical profession, and medical technology are embedded in society and culture. We will ask how medicine is connected to various sociocultural factors such as gender, social class, race, and administrative cultures. We will examine the rise of medical sociology as a discipline, the professionalization of medicine, and processes of medicalization and demedicalization. We will look at alternative medical practices and how they differ from and converge with the dominant medical paradigm. We will focus on the rise of medical technology in clinical practice with a special emphases on reproductive technologies. We will focus on the body as a site for medical knowledge, including the medicalization of sex differences, the effect of culture on nutrition, and eating disorders such as obesity and anorexia nervosa. We will also read various classic and contemporary texts that speak to the illness experience and the culture of surgeons, hospitals, and patients, and we will discuss various case studies in the social construction of physical and mental illness.
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STS 3181 : Living in an Uncertain World: Science, Technology, and Risk
Crosslisted as: AMST 3185, BSOC 3181, HIST 3181 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the history, sociology, and ethics of risk. In particular, we will focus on the complex and often ambiguous relationship between science, technology, and risk. A historical perspective shows how science and technology have generated risks while they have also played key roles in managing and solving those very risks. By examining several case studies, including 19th-century mining, the 1911 Triangle fire, nuclear science, the space shuttle disasters, asbestos litigation, Hurricane Katrina, and the contemporary financial crisis, we will consider how risk and ideas about risk have changed over time. By exploring different historical and cultural responses to risk, we will examine the sociopolitical dimensions of the definitions, perceptions, and management of risk both in the past and the present.
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STS 3241 : Environmental Sociology
Crosslisted as: DSOC 3240, SOC 3240 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Humans have fraught relationships with the animals, plants, land, water—even geological processes—around us. We come together to revere, conserve, protect the things many call nature. We struggle over who gets to use what, which resources to use or to keep intact, which scientific claims are true and worthy of action. Every environmental concern is on some level a social concern, and more social concerns than we often realize are environmental concerns. In this course, we will examine how people make and respond to environmental change and how groups of people form, express, fight over, and work out environmental concerns. We will consider how population change, economic activity, government action, social movements, and changing ways of thinking shape human-environmental relationships. The fundamental goal of this course is to give you knowledge, analytical tools, and expressive skills that make you confident to address environmental concerns as a social scientist and a citizen. 
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STS 3561 : Computing Cultures
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 3061, COMM 3560, INFO 3561, VISST 3560 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Computers are powerful tools for working, playing, thinking, and living. Laptops, PDAs, webcams, cell phones, and iPods are not just devices, they also provide narratives, metaphors, and ways of seeing the world. This course critically examines how computing technology and society shape each other and how this plays out in our everyday lives. Identifies how computers, networks, and information technologies reproduce, reinforce, and rework existing cultural trends, norms, and values. Looks at the values embodied in the cultures of computing and considers alternative ways to imagine, build, and work with information technologies.
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STS 3601 : Ethical Issues in Engineering Practice
Crosslisted as: ECE 3600, ENGRG 3600 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Studies ethical issues involved in engineering practice. Explores the engineer's role in technical decision-making in organizations.  Considers the engineer's relationship to the uses of technology in society, especially emerging technologies. Case studies covered include the Space Shuttle Challenger, the Space Shuttle Columbia, The Macondo Well Blowout, The Ford Pinto Case, The VW Emissions scandal, the Tesla Automatic Driving accident, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Fukushima, and the Bhopal case, among others.  Technology topics considered include brain-machine interface, human enhancement, genetic engineering, intelligent autonomous systems, privacy and surveillance, energy technologies, and environmental issues, among others.  Codes of ethics in engineering, ethical theory, philosophical models of knowledge production, and sociological models of human and technological agency are introduced to analyze these issues. 
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BSOC 3751 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Projects under the direction of a Biology and Society faculty member are encouraged as part of the program of study within the student's concentration area. Applications for research projects are accepted by individual faculty members. Students may enroll for 1 to 4 credits in BSOC 3751 Independent Study with written permission of the faculty supervisor and may elect either the letter grade or the S-U option. Students may elect to do an independent study project as an alternative to, or in advance of, an honors project. Information on faculty research, scholarly activities, and undergraduate opportunities are available in the Biology and Society Office, 303 Morrill Hall. Independent study credits may not be used in completion of the major requirements.
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STS 3991 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
More information about independent study available in 303 Morrill Hall.
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STS 4041 : Controversies in Science, Technology and Medicine: What They Are and How to Study Them
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Scientists in the main try to avoid controversy whilst STS scholars argue that controversy can be a motor of scientific change. There is a lengthy tradition of research into different forms of controversies within science, technology, and medicine. We will read selectively and discuss critically this literature. Students will differentiate between "priority disputes" over credit for discoveries and wider controversies, such as "global warming", which bring in many diverse audiences.  We will cover historical cases as well as contemporary ones.  Students will critically evaluate the main analytical approaches towards controversies and we will also explore new web-based tools for researching controversies.   
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STS 4101 : The Entangled Lives of Humans and Animals
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4101, BSOC 4101 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
One animal behaviorist speculates that big brains develop when species are social; that is, when they must read cues from members of their group to understand when to approach, when to flee, when to fight, when to care. This course looks not only at animals in their social lives, but also at animals in their lives with us. We ask questions about how species become entangled and what that means for both parties, about the social lives of animals independently and with humans, about the survival of human and animal species, and about what it means to use animals for science, food, and profit. The course draws on readings from Anthropology, Science & Technology Studies, and animal trainers and behaviorists.
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STS 4251 : Climate History: New Perspectives on Science, Society, and Environment
Crosslisted as: HIST 4255 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Climate change is old news. Human societies have been debating and coping with climatic changes since long before the (relatively) recent advent of massive-scale greenhouse gas emissions. In this seminar, we will immerse ourselves in scholarly debates about the role of climate change in causing social, economic, cultural, and political changes. For instance, did the Little Ice Age spark sixteenth-century witch-hunts in Europe? We will also delve into case studies focusing on historical climate beliefs and their significance. How did climate theory legitimize French colonialism in the Maghreb? Throughout the course, we will discuss how climate history can inform contemporary climate change discourse and activism.
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STS 4451 : Making Science Policy: The Real World
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course focuses on what happens when science meet the policy-making world. We will discuss theoretical and empirical studies in Science & Technology Studies that analyze the interactions between science, society and politics. We will specifically investigate the mechanisms by which science may impact policy-making by focusing on: the rise of science diplomacy, initiatives to use science in order to further development goals, and efforts to produce evidence-based foreign policy. We will also focus on currently hotly debated political issues in government affairs, including the politization and militarization of space, the rise of big data, the politics of climate change, and the construction of border walls. As part of this course we will hear from experts in the federal government on how they attempt to integrate science into the everyday workings of governance.
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STS 4561 : Stars, Scores, and Rankings: Evaluation and Society
Crosslisted as: INFO 4561, SOC 4560 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Evaluation is a pervasive feature of contemporary life. Professors, doctors, countries, hotels, pollution, books, intelligence: there is hardly anything that is not subject to some form of review, rating, or ranking these days. This senior seminar examines the practices, cultures, and technologies of evaluation and asks how value is established, maintained, compared, subverted, resisted, and institutionalized in a range of different settings. Topics include user reviews, institutional audit, ranking and commensuration, algorithmic evaluation, tasting, gossip, and awards. Drawing on case studies from science, technology, culture, accounting, art, environment, and everyday life, we shall explore how evaluation comes to order our lives – and why it is so difficult to resist.
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BSOC 4651 : Bodies and Diseases in the Middle East (1500-2000)
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4652, NES 4652, NES 6652 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Bodies and Diseases in the Middle East (1500-2000) will explore the history of medicine and science in the Middle East from early modern period to the present. It covers the main topics and questions regarding bodies, diseases, and medical institutions within the framework of major historical developments in world and region's history. The course investigates how medicine and knowledge about diseases and bodies changed political and social conditions as well as how the latter defined and transformed the ways in which people imagined health, life, and environment. Scholars have often analyzed history of medicine in the Middle Eastern societies either in relation to Islamic culture in the early modern period or in relation to more recent Westernization. This course seeks to challenge these fixed paradigms and shed light onto questions and research agendas that will unearth the encounters, connections and mobility of bacteria, bodies, and medical methods among various communities by locating the history of medical knowledge and practices of the Middle East within global history.  It will highlight that the history of medicine in the colonial world itself is varied and wide ranging, investigating how medical missions intersected with civilizing missions, how colonial discourses were used to explain disease prevalence, and the relationship between the metropole and colony in propagating certain medical theories and practices. The course seeks to facilitate student engagement with various primary and secondary sources and new technologies to teach both historiographical methods and the content of the history of medicine in the Middle East.
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BSOC 4682 : Healing and Medicine in Africa
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4682, ASRC 4682 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Healing and medicine are simultaneously individual and political, biological and cultural. In this class, we will study the expansion of biomedicine in Africa, the continuities and changes embodied in traditional medicine, and the relationship between medicine, science and law. We will explore the questions African therapeutics poses about the intimate ways that power works on and through bodies. Our readings will frame current debates around colonial and postcolonial forms of governance through medicine, the contradictions of humanitarianism and the health "crisis" in Africa, and the rise of new forms of "therapeutic citizenship." We will examine the ways in which Africa is central to the biopolitics of the contemporary global order.
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STS 4741 : Science, Medicine, the Body: A Critical Race and Feminist Inquiry
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4114, ANTHR 7114, BSOC 4741, BSOC 7741, FGSS 4114, FGSS 7114, STS 7741 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course we will consider the production of the human body as an artifact of race, sex and gender through the discourses, practices, and technologies of bio-science and bio-medicine. We will read critical race, feminist, and postcolonial critiques of science and medicine as forms of knowledge complicit with imperial, racist and patriarchal political projects as well as conduits for humanitarianism and emancipation. We will examine case studies in the histories of science and medicine such as the Tuskegee syphilis experiment, commercial surrogacy, plastic surgery, the global trade in organs, and the HeLa cell line. We will also think together about collaborations between patients and doctors, citizens and scientists, that have produced new ways of inhabiting the body, new forms of human relations, and new kinds of justice.
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STS 4751 : Science, Race, and Colonialism
Crosslisted as: HIST 4751 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is divided into three major thematic sections. The first looks at the history of racial thinking in the West. We begin with the existence (or not) of conceptions of biological race in the early- modern period, focusing on early voyages of discovery and so-called "first encounters" between the peoples of the Old and New Worlds.  In the second part of the course we will look at early enunciations of racial thought in the late 18th century and at the problems of classification that these raised, before examining the roots of "Scientific Racism." We close with a look at Darwin, Social Darwinism, and eugenics movements in different national contexts.  The last third of the course looks at science and technology in colonial contexts, including "colonial technologies" (guns, steam- ships, and telegraphs) as well as medicine and public hygiene.
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STS 4841 : What is (an) Epidemic? (Infectious Diseases in Historical, Social, and Political Perspective)
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4041, BSOC 4841, FGSS 4841 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The term "epidemic" travels widely and wildly in contemporary worlds.  But, what, when and where is "the epidemic"? How and why does epidemic unfold? This senior seminar offers an interdisciplinary exploration of infectious diseases.  Our investigations take us from medieval Europe's "Black Plague," to Tuberculosis in early twentieth century United States and its global resurgence at the turn of the twenty-first, to Ebola and its ongoing, periodic outbreaks today. We consider the consequences epidemics have for how we live and imagine shared ecological futures.  Examining work from the life sciences, social sciences, and arts & humanities, we explore the ways in which life and death, disease and survivability, health and thriving are shaped by infectious microbes, embodied eco-social forces, and contingent regimes of knowledge-power. 
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STS 4992 : Honors Project II
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4992, HE 4992 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Students must register for the 4 credits each semester (BSOC 4991-BSOC 4992) for a total of 8 credits. After the first semester, students receive a letter grade of "R"; a letter grade for both semesters is submitted at the end of the second semester whether or not the student completes a thesis or is recommended for honors. Minimally, an honors thesis outline and bibliography should be completed during the first semester. In consultation with the advisors, the director of undergraduate studies will evaluate whether the student should continue working on an honors project. Students should note that these courses are to be taken in addition to those courses that meet the regular major requirements. If students do not complete the second semester of the honors project, they must change the first semester to independent  study to clear the "R" and receive a grade. Otherwise, the "R" will remain on their record and prevent them from graduating.
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STS 6061 : Science, Technology and Capitalism
Crosslisted as: HIST 6065 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the relationship between scientific development, technological innovation and maintenance, and the capitalistic forces that support and benefit from these activities.
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STS 6101 : Sense, Movement, Sociality
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 6101 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course begins from the premise that bodies and sensing are the ground of sociality. Drawing on texts from Anthropology, Science & Technology Studies, Disability Studies, and Animal Studies, as well as some classics of social theory, this course brings bodies and senses to the fore in thinking about how humans live, work, relate, and create together. It considers all the senses from "the big five" (sight, hearing, touch, smell, taste) to the "hidden senses" (balance, kinesthesia, proprioception, and affect). The goal is to read and think materially, semiotically, and theoretically about how humans, as a social species, interact with our own and other species through our bodies, our senses, and our movements. 
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STS 6311 : Qualitative Research Methods for Studying Science
Crosslisted as: SOC 6310 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this Graduate seminar we will discuss the nature, politics and basic assumptions underlying qualitative research. We will examine a selection of qualitative methods ranging from interviewing, oral history, ethnography, participant observation, archival research and visual methods. We will also discuss the relationship between theory and method. All stages of a research project will be discussed - choice of research topic and appropriate methods; human subject concerns and permissions; issues regarding doing research; as well as the process of writing up and publishing research findings.
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STS 6661 : Public Engagement in Science
Crosslisted as: COMM 6660 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In recent years, the scientific community has increasingly referred to "public engagement in science." This seminar explores the scholarly literature addressing that move; the links between "public engagement" and earlier concerns about sciences literacy, public understanding of science, and outreach; and the intersections between literature in communication and in science studies on issues involving the relationships among science(s) and public(s).
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STS 6991 : Graduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Applications and information are available in 303 Morrill Hall.
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BSOC 7682 : Healing and Medicine in Africa
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 7682, ASRC 7682 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Healing and medicine are simultaneously individual and political, biological and cultural. In this class, we will study the expansion of biomedicine in Africa, the continuities and changes embodied in traditional medicine, and the relationship between medicine, science and law. We will explore the questions African therapeutics poses about the intimate ways that power works on and through bodies. Our readings will frame current debates around colonial and postcolonial forms of governance through medicine, the contradictions of humanitarianism and the health "crisis" in Africa, and the rise of new forms of "therapeutic citizenship." We will examine the ways in which Africa is central to the biopolitics of the contemporary global order.
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STS 7741 : Science, Medicine, the Body: A Critical Race and Feminist Inquiry
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4114, ANTHR 7114, BSOC 4741, BSOC 7741, FGSS 4114, FGSS 7114, STS 4741 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course we will consider the production of the human body as an artifact of race, sex and gender through the discourses, practices, and technologies of bio-science and bio-medicine.  We will read critical race, feminist, and postcolonial critiques of science and medicine as forms of knowledge complicit with imperial, racist and patriarchal political projects as well as conduits for humanitarianism and emancipation.  We will examine case studies in the histories of science and medicine such as the Tuskegee syphilis experiment, commercial surrogacy, plastic surgery, the global trade in organs, and the HeLa cell line.    We will also think together about collaborations between patients and doctors, citizens and scientists, that have produced new ways of inhabiting the body, new forms of human relations, and new kinds of justice.
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STS 7937 : Proseminar in Peace Studies
Crosslisted as: GOVT 7937, HIST 7937 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Proseminar in Peace Studies offers a multidisciplinary review of issues related to peace and conflict at the graduate level. The course is led by the director of the Judith Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and is based on the Institute's weekly seminar series, featuring outside visitors and Cornell faculty. 
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