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STS 1101 : Science, Technology, and Politics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Christine Leuenberger
From global warming to surveillance of citizens to health-care reform, issues in science, technology, and medicine are also political issues. This course uses contemporary scientific controversies to explore the intersections of science and politics. Issues explored may include the role of the military and private sector in funding research, the politics of experts and expertise, computer privacy and national security, and environmental politics.
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STS 1123 : FWS: Technology and Society Topics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Derek Parrott
This seminar explores the ways in which Technology and Society shape one another and provides the opportunity to write extensively about this mutual shaping. Topics vary by section.
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STS 1126 : FWS: Science and Society Topics
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Rebecca Harrison
Mehmet Ekinci
Ellen Abrams
This seminar explores the ways in which Science and Society shape one another and provides the opportunity to write extensively about this mutual shaping. Topics vary by section.
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STS 1180 : Evolution
Crosslisted as: BIOEE 1180 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Michelle Smith
Evolution is the central concept in biology. This course examines evolution as a science and places it in an historical context. Classes focus on descent with modification, the nature of natural selection, the history of the earth, the information content of the fossil record, and processes responsible for diversification (speciation and extinction). The science of evolutionary biology is presented in the context of a broader history of ideas in science. The course also explores the importance of evolutionary thinking in the 21st century, including discussion of antibiotic and pesticide resistance, personalized genomics, and climate change.
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STS 2051 : Ethical Issues in Health and Medicine
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2051 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Kim Overby
In the rapidly changing world of healthcare, complex ethical issues arise from interpersonal interactions between patients and clinicians to broad controversies that propel medicine into headline news.  This course will examine ethical challenges in contemporary medicine, healthcare, and biomedical research from the bedside to health policy.  Using case-vignettes, news stories, narratives, and readings from the healthcare, ethics, and social science literature we will examine issues from multiple vantage points. A range of topics will be explored including the patient-clinician relationship, heath care decision-making, issues at the beginning and end-of-life, technological advances, human experimentation, healthcare systems, and distributive justice. The course will also examine the fluidity of normative ethical boundaries, and how context and point of reference influence our perceptions of and approach to ethical issues. 
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BSOC 2101 : Plagues and People
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2101, ENTOM 2100, BSOC 2101, ENTOM 2100 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Marina Caillaud
Laura Harrington
Human diseases have affected human lives and society through history. This course focuses on the pathogens, parasites, and arthropods causing human plagues through multiple perspectives (biomedical, social, ethical, cultural). Those plagues that have had the greatest impact on human culture and expression are emphasized. Lectures are supplemented with readings, videos and discussions. Also addresses emerging diseases, bioterrorism, and future plagues. Students taking the course for 3 credits participate in one discussion session each week and may do a comprehensive final project rather than a final exam.
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STS 2131 : Science Fiction
Crosslisted as: BSOC 2131, COML 2035, ENGL 2035 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Anindita Banerjee
Science fiction is not merely a literary genre but a whole way of being, thinking, and acting in the modern world. This course explores classic and contemporary science fiction from Frankenstein to The Hunger Games alongside a rich array of fiction and films from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Our discussions will position these works vis-à-vis seminal thinkers, ranging from Plato to Descartes and Donna Haraway to Paul Crutzen, who ask the same questions as science fiction does about our selves, our world, and our future.
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BSOC 2245 : Health and Disease in the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 2245, ARKEO 2245 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Matthew Velasco
The history of humankind is also a history of health and disease; the rise of agricultural societies, ancient cities, and colonial empires had wide-ranging effects on diet and nutrition, the spread of infectious diseases, and occurrence of other health conditions. This history has also been shaped by complex interactions between environment, technology, and society. Using archaeological, environmental, textual, and skeletal evidence, we will survey major epidemiological transitions from the Paleolithic to the age of European conquest. We will also examine diverse cultural experiences of health, illness, and the body. How do medical practices from "pre-modern" societies, such as the medieval Islamic world and the Inca Empire, challenge dominant narratives of scientific development? The implications of past health patterns for modern-day communities will also be explored.
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STS 2280 : What is Public Health?
Crosslisted as: AMST 2280 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Hannah LeBlanc
How have different dimensions of our lives become matters of public health? Focusing on modern America, this course explores how public health has been bound up with histories of the state, the economy, and inequality. Most broadly, we will ask what is defined as a public health problem and why. The class examines early attempts to control infectious disease, the expansion of public health in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and new dimensions of public health in the post-war period. In the final portion, the class will explore recently recognized threats to the public's health. Throughout, we will pay attention to the practices of public health that have fostered or challenged hierarchies of race, gender, class, and ability.
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BSOC 2420 : Nature/Culture: Ethnographic Approaches to Human-Environment Relations
Crosslisted as: AIIS 2420, ANTHR 2420 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Paul Nadasdy
One of the most pressing questions of our time is how we should understand the relationship between nature (or "the environment") and culture (or society) - and/or whether these should be viewed as separate domains at all.  How one answers this question has important implications for how we go about thinking and acting in such diverse social arenas as environmental politics, development, and indigenous-state relations.  This course serves as an introduction to the various ways anthropologists and other scholars have conceptualized the relationship between humans and the environment and considers the material and political consequences that flow from these conceptualizations.
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STS 2451 : Introduction to Bioethics
Crosslisted as: PHIL 2455 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Julia Markovits
Bioethics is the study of ethical problems brought about by advances in the medical field.  Questions we'll discuss may include:  Is it morally permissible to advance a patient's death, at his or her request, to reduce suffering?  Is there a moral dilemma between killing someone and letting someone die?  What ethical issues are raised by advance care planning?  How should the rights of pregnant women be balanced against those of the fetus?  What constitutes informed consent?  Should medical treatment ever be compulsory?  Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children?  Are some forms of human enhancement morally troubling?  Should we aim to be better than well?  How should scarce health care resources or costly therapies be allocated to those in need?  Should organ sales be permitted?  Should doctors or hospitals be permitted to refuse to provide certain medical services that violate their consciences?
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STS 2470 : Digital Latinxs
Crosslisted as: AMST 2470, LSP 2470 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Ivan Chaar Lopez
Digital technology has been a part of modern life in the U.S. since the Cold War. A growing population of users works, plays, become politically active and fight-off boredom through digital technology. But who are these users? Where do they congregate and how do they emerge? How do they make meaning of their lives? This course focuses on the everyday experiences of Latinxs as users. It examines their participation in digital environments and their engagements with technology while paying attention to their social, political, and cultural contexts. Rather than imagine "users" as a universal category, students will learn about the experiences of Latinxs in digital spaces and their contributions to what scholars call digital culture.
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STS 2561 : Medicine and Healing in China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 2262, BSOC 2561, CAPS 2262, HIST 2562 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Tj Hinrichs
An exploration of processes of change in health care practices in China. Focuses on key transitions, such as the emergence of canonical medicine, of Daoist approaches to healing and longevity, of "scholar physicians," and of "traditional Chinese medicine" in modern China.  Inquires into the development of healing practices in relation to both popular and specialist views of the body and disease; health care as organized by individuals, families, communities, and states; the transmission of medical knowledge; and healer-patient relations. Course readings include primary texts in translation as well as secondary materials. 
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STS 2751 : Ethical Issues in Intelligent Autonomous Systems
Crosslisted as: ECE 2750, ENGRG 2750, INFO 2750 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Park Doing
Covers the ethics of intelligent autonomous systems. Fulfills liberal studies credit – is not an ECE technical elective. As technologies and algorithms that can autonomously take in information, make decisions, and act on those decisions become more and more prevalent, questions arise as to the moral and ethical aspects of their use. What are the philosophical foundations for a new Robot Ethics? Topics covered include social and therapeutic robotics, search and rescue, surveillance, military decision making, financial markets, social media, robot artists, robot scientists, automation, medical robotics, and policing, among others.
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BSOC 2781 : Body as Text: Pleasure and Danger
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2780, FGSS 2780, LGBT 2780 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Masha Raskolnikov
We experience our bodies as so much a part of who we are that we take them for granted. Yet the way we think about the body has a history of its own. This class looks at how the idea of "the body" gets constructed over time. How has the body come to have attributes called "gender," "sexuality," and "race"? Why have some bodies been seen as monstrous, perverted, and unholy, others as gorgeous, normal, and divine? What makes bodies pleasurable and dangerous? We'll find out by examining a broad range of evidence from the ancient era to the present day, including literature (Ovid, Kafka, Octavia Butler), philosophy (Plato, Descartes, Judith Butler), film, and the history of science.
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STS 2921 : Inventing an Information Society
Crosslisted as: AMST 2980, ECE 2980, ENGRG 2980, HIST 2920, INFO 2921 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Ronald Kline
Explores the history of information technology from the 1830s to the present by considering the technical and social history of telecommunications (telegraph and the telephone), radio, television, computers, and the Internet. Emphasis is on the changing relationship between science and technology, the economic aspects of innovation, gender and technology, and other social relations of this technology.
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STS 3011 : Life Sciences and Society
Crosslisted as: BSOC 3011 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Christopher Roebuck
Biology and biotechnology are major influences on modern life. In addition, socio-political and historical conditions have shaped biological research and its applications in medicine, agriculture, environmental science, etc. Life science research is itself a social process involving complex human dynamics, different kinds of work and an array of social and natural systems. The course aims to introduce students to critical science and technology studies (S&TS) perspectives on the knowledge and practices of life sciences. The course is designed to prepare students for more advanced courses in the Biology & Society and S&TS majors, but students who do not plan to take further courses in those subjects can get critical insight into biology's profound role in both science and society.
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STS 3020 : Science Writing for the Media
Crosslisted as: COMM 3020 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Danielle Eiseman
How to write about science, technology, and medicine for the media. Writing assignments focus on writing news for web sites, blogs, magazines, and other media.
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STS 3111 : Sociology of Medicine
Crosslisted as: BSOC 3111, DSOC 3111, SOC 3130 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Christine Leuenberger
This course provides an introduction to the ways in which medical practice, the medical profession, and medical technology are embedded in society and culture. We will ask how medicine is connected to various sociocultural factors such as gender, social class, race, and administrative cultures. We will examine the rise of medical sociology as a discipline, the professionalization of medicine, and processes of medicalization and demedicalization. We will look at alternative medical practices and how they differ from and converge with the dominant medical paradigm. We will focus on the rise of medical technology in clinical practice with a special emphases on reproductive technologies. We will focus on the body as a site for medical knowledge, including the medicalization of sex differences, the effect of culture on nutrition, and eating disorders such as obesity and anorexia nervosa. We will also read various classic and contemporary texts that speak to the illness experience and the culture of surgeons, hospitals, and patients, and we will discuss various case studies in the social construction of physical and mental illness.
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STS 3231 : Global Health Security and Diplomacy
Crosslisted as: BSOC 3231 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jason Rao
This course analyzes the development of foreign policy at the nexus of global health and national security in an attempt to better define and understand the evolving concept of "Global Health Security and Diplomacy". Interdisciplinary in nature, the course covers a broad set of themes and their intersection, including science and technology policy, biodefense and counter terrorism, gender disparity and development, nonproliferation, food security, global health, and U.S. diplomacy. Emphasis is placed on the current U.S. administration's efforts to advance a national security and foreign policy agenda inclusive of global grand challenges. We will also pay particular attention to understanding to the role of non-governmental organizations in global health security.
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STS 3311 : Environmental Governance
Crosslisted as: BSOC 3311, DSOC 3311, DSOC 6320, NTRES 3311, NTRES 6310 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Steven Wolf
Environmental governance is defined as the assemblage of institutions that regulate society-nature interactions and shape environmental outcomes across a range of spatial and temporal scales.  Institutions, broadly defined, are mechanisms of social coordination including laws (formal) and social norms (informal) that guide the behavior of individuals.  Participants in the course will explore the roles of governments, markets, and collective action in environmental management and mismanagement. We will emphasize interactions among leading environmental policy strategies: public regulation, market-based incentives, and community-based resource management. The course is focused around a set of analytic perspectives.  These theoretical frameworks allow us to synthesize empirical observations and material changes in ways that inform our understanding of contemporary evolution of environmental policy and management.
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BSOC 3441 : Insect Conservation Biology
Crosslisted as: ENTOM 3440 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
John Losey
In-depth look at the concepts and issues surrounding the conservation of insects and other invertebrates. Topics include sampling rare populations; insect conservation genetics; the role of phylogeny in determining conservation priorities; refuge design; saving individual species; plus the unique political, social, and ethical aspects of insect conservation and preservation of their ecological services (i.e., pollination, decomposition, pest suppression, and insectivore food sources).
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BSOC 3751 : Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Peter Dear
Stephen Hilgartner
Ronald Kline
Christine Leuenberger
Bruce Lewenstein
Michael Lynch
Trevor Pinch
Rachel Prentice
Sara Pritchard
Margaret Rossiter
Phoebe Sengers
Suman Seth
Laura Harrington
Rosemary Avery
Bruce Johnson
Jessica Ratcliff
Projects under the direction of a Biology and Society faculty member are encouraged as part of the program of study within the student's concentration area. Applications for research projects are accepted by individual faculty members. Students may enroll for 1 to 4 credits in BSOC 3751 Independent Study with written permission of the faculty supervisor and may elect either the letter grade or the S-U option. Students may elect to do an independent study project as an alternative to, or in advance of, an honors project. Information on faculty research, scholarly activities, and undergraduate opportunities are available in the Biology and Society Office, 303 Morrill Hall. Independent study credits may not be used in completion of the major requirements.
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STS 3911 : Science in the American Polity, 1960 to Now
Crosslisted as: AMST 3911, GOVT 3091 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Stephen Hilgartner
This course reviews the changing political relations between science, technology, and the state in America from 1960 to the present. It focuses on policy choices involving science and technology in different institutional settings, such as Congress, the court system, and regulatory agencies. The tension between the concepts of science as an autonomous republic and as just another interest group is a central theme.
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STS 3991 : Undergraduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Peter Dear
Stephen Hilgartner
Ronald Kline
Christine Leuenberger
Bruce Lewenstein
Michael Lynch
Trevor Pinch
Rachel Prentice
Sara Pritchard
Margaret Rossiter
Phoebe Sengers
Suman Seth
Malte Ziewitz
Applications for research projects are accepted by individual STS faculty members. Students may enroll for 1–4 credits in STS 3991 with written permission of the faculty supervisor and may elect either the letter grade or the S–U option. Information on faculty research, scholarly activities, and undergraduate opportunities are available in the Science & Technology Studies office, 303 Morrill Hall. Independent study credits may not be used in completion of the major requirements.
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STS 4041 : Controversies in Science, Technology and Medicine: What They Are and How to Study Them
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Trevor Pinch
Scientists in the main try to avoid controversy whilst STS scholars argue that controversy can be a motor of scientific change. There is a lengthy tradition of research into different forms of controversies within science, technology, and medicine. We will read selectively and discuss critically this literature. Students will differentiate between "priority disputes" over credit for discoveries and wider controversies, such as "global warming", which bring in many diverse audiences.  We will cover historical cases as well as contemporary ones.  Students will critically evaluate the main analytical approaches towards controversies and we will also explore new web-based tools for researching controversies.   
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STS 4240 : Designing Technology for Social Impact
Crosslisted as: INFO 4240 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Phoebe Sengers
The social impact of technologies is typically thought about fairly late, if ever, in the design process. Indeed, it can be difficult at design time to predict what effects technologies will have. Nevertheless, design decisions can inadvertently "lock in" particular values early on. In this course, we will draw on science & technology studies, technology design, and the arts to analyze the values embodied in technology design and to design technologies to promote positive social impact. What social and cultural values do technology designs consciously or unconsciously promote? To what degree can social impact be "built into" a technology? How can we take social and cultural values into account in design?
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STS 4312 : Synthesizing Pop: Electronics and the Musical Imagination
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4312, FGSS 6312, LGBT 4312, LGBT 6312, MUSIC 4312, MUSIC 6312, STS 6312 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Roger Moseley
Judith Peraino
From Switched-On Bach to Synthpop and EDM, since the late 1960s electronic synthesizers have expanded the sonic palette and identity formation of popular musicians, leading to new concepts of sound and performance as well as communal, technological, and human interfaces. This course will explore the cultural history of analog synthesizers and their progeny of digital devices (samplers, sequencers, drum machines) and desktop technologies that revolutionized popular music soundscapes and embodiment. Synthesis will be considered as both a musical technology and theoretical concept that together spark imagined cyborg identities and post-human futures, challenging and resynthesizing categories of gender, sexuality, and race. Student will also have the opportunity to engage with Cornell's Robert Moog Archive and develop research, creative, or curation projects that may be featured in the spring 2020 exhibition and programming to celebrate this collection.  This course is open to graduate students and fourth-year undergraduates by permission.  Undergraduates should contact the instructor before enrolling.
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STS 4330 : How Do We Know Nature? Language, Knowledge and the Environment
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4330, COGST 4330 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Luisa Cortesi
How do we perceive and know the world around us? Which are the multiple ways in which we negotiate this knowledge into language and embodied practice? Does one's position in society matter? Is the thing reducible to its representation? This senior seminar proposes to confront the production of knowledge on nature through the lenses of our (and others') ways of wording it. Towards the end of the semester, we will focus on the concept of adaptation: how do we cope with an increasingly difficult environment? This course includes an engaged research component and experiential learning—we will prepare an art/research installation called "The Flood Room: Environmental Knowledge, Disaster Preparedness, Community Resilience and Climate Change Communication in Ithaca, New York" in collaboration with local community organizations.
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STS 4641 : Technologies of Power in Latin American Dirty Wars
Crosslisted as: HIST 4641, HIST 6641, ROMS 4641, ROMS 6641, SHUM 4641, SHUM 6641, STS 6641 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Willie Hiatt
This seminar explores Latin American political violence since the 1970s, focusing on the role technology played in internal conflicts called "Dirty Wars," in which the state employed extrajudicial violence to halt leftist or communist "subversion." These responses by police, military, and paramilitary groups left hundreds of thousands of civilians dead. Reports from large-scale investigations called truth commissions, first-person testimonies, fiction, and films underscore the employment of technology in these conflicts—electrical torture, the destruction of electrical towers, foreign-made weapons and vehicles, and seizures of media stations and newspapers. The seminar emphasizes the history of technology in human rights violations more broadly, from the 1994 Rwandan genocide to the United States' responses to extremism after 9/11. For longer description and instructor bio, visit societyhumanities.as.cornell.edu/courses
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STS 4751 : Science, Race, and Colonialism
Crosslisted as: HIST 4751 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Suman Seth
This course is divided into three major thematic sections. The first looks at the history of racial thinking in the West. We begin with the existence (or not) of conceptions of biological race in the early- modern period, focusing on early voyages of discovery and so-called "first encounters" between the peoples of the Old and New Worlds.  In the second part of the course we will look at early enunciations of racial thought in the late 18th century and at the problems of classification that these raised, before examining the roots of "Scientific Racism." We close with a look at Darwin, Social Darwinism, and eugenics movements in different national contexts.  The last third of the course looks at science and technology in colonial contexts, including "colonial technologies" (guns, steam- ships, and telegraphs) as well as medicine and public hygiene.
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STS 4841 : What is (an) Epidemic? (Infectious Diseases in Historical, Social, and Political Perspective)
Crosslisted as: ANTHR 4041, BSOC 4841, FGSS 4841 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Christopher Roebuck
The term "epidemic" travels widely and wildly in contemporary worlds.  But, what, when and where is "the epidemic"? How and why does epidemic unfold? This senior seminar offers an interdisciplinary exploration of infectious diseases.  Our investigations take us from medieval Europe's "Black Plague," to Tuberculosis in early twentieth century United States and its global resurgence at the turn of the twenty-first, to Ebola and its ongoing, periodic outbreaks today. We consider the consequences epidemics have for how we live and imagine shared ecological futures.  Examining work from the life sciences, social sciences, and arts & humanities, we explore the ways in which life and death, disease and survivability, health and thriving are shaped by infectious microbes, embodied eco-social forces, and contingent regimes of knowledge-power. 
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STS 4902 : Environmental Humanities: Theories and Methods
Crosslisted as: COML 4902, COML 6902, STS 6902 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Anindita Banerjee
The environmental humanities pose a radically different set of questions to texts, materials, and contexts that were previously approached in terms of human intentions and actions alone. This seminar explores the theoretical and methodological potentials of this rapidly emerging and constantly evolving field from the interdisciplinary, comparative perspective that it also axiomatically demands. Together we will discuss seminal works that tackle four foundational concepts imperative for reframing the traditional concerns of the humanities under the sign of anthropogenic planetary change -- scale, form, matter/ energy, and distribution. The seminar will develop ways to configure these focal points to the theoretical and practical concerns of various disciplinary approaches and, especially, to participants' individual interests and research projects.
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STS 4991 : Honors Project I
Crosslisted as: BSOC 4991 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Students must register for 4 credits each semester (4991-4992) for a total of 8 credits. After the first semester, students receive a letter grade of "R"; a letter grade for both semesters is submitted at the end of the second semester whether or not the student completes a thesis or is recommended for honors. Minimally, an honors thesis outline and bibliography should be completed during the first semester. In consultation with the advisors, the director of undergraduate studies will evaluate whether the student should continue working on an honors project. Students should note that these courses are to be taken in addition to those courses that meet the regular major requirements. If students do not complete the second semester of the honors project, they must change the first semester to independent study to clear the "R" and receive a grade. Otherwise, the "R" will remain on their record and prevent them from graduating.
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STS 6061 : Science, Technology and Capitalism
Crosslisted as: HIST 6065 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jessica Ratcliff
This course examines the relationship between scientific development, technological innovation and maintenance, and the capitalistic forces that support and benefit from these activities.
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STS 6121 : Environmental History
Crosslisted as: HIST 6221 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Aaron Sachs
This graduate seminar offers an introduction to environmental history—the study of human interactions with nonhuman nature in the past. It is a subfield within the historical discipline that has complex roots, an interdisciplinary orientation, and synergies with fields across the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. This seminar explores environmental history on three levels: historically, historiographically, and theoretically. What are some of the key historical processes that have shaped humans' historical relationships with the environment at various scales? How have environmental historians (re)conceptualized the field as it has developed over the past half-century? What analytic concepts have environmental historians used to understand human-natural relations? Select themes include ecological imperialism, labor and work, body/environment, global environmental history, "mainstreaming" environmental history, and the Anthropocene.
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STS 6312 : Synthesizing Pop: Electronics and the Musical Imagination
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4312, FGSS 6312, LGBT 4312, LGBT 6312, MUSIC 4312, MUSIC 6312, STS 4312 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Roger Moseley
Judith Peraino
From Switched-On Bach to Synthpop and EDM, since the late 1960s electronic synthesizers have expanded the sonic palette and identity formation of popular musicians, leading to new concepts of sound and performance as well as communal, technological, and human interfaces. This course will explore the cultural history of analog synthesizers and their progeny of digital devices (samplers, sequencers, drum machines) and desktop technologies that revolutionized popular music soundscapes and embodiment. Synthesis will be considered as both a musical technology and theoretical concept that together spark imagined cyborg identities and post-human futures, challenging and resynthesizing categories of gender, sexuality, and race. Student will also have the opportunity to engage with Cornell's Robert Moog Archive and develop research, creative, or curation projects that may be featured in the spring 2020 exhibition and programming to celebrate this collection.  This course is open to graduate students and fourth-year undergraduates by permission.  Undergraduates should contact the instructor before enrolling.
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STS 6321 : Inside Technology
Crosslisted as: SOC 6320 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Trevor Pinch
Rather than analyze the social impact of technology upon society, this course investigates how society gets inside technology. In other words, is it possible that the very design of technologies embody assumptions about the nature of society? And, if so, are alternative technologies, which embody different assumptions about society, possible? Do engineers have implicit theories about society? Is technology gendered? How can we understand the interaction of society and technology? Throughout the course the arguments are illustrated by detailed examinations of particular technologies, such as the ballistic missile, the bicycle, the electric car, and the refrigerator.
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STS 6641 : Technologies of Power in Latin American Dirty Wars
Crosslisted as: HIST 4641, HIST 6641, ROMS 4641, ROMS 6641, SHUM 4641, SHUM 6641, STS 4641 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Willie Hiatt
This seminar explores Latin American political violence since the 1970s, focusing on the role technology played in internal conflicts called "Dirty Wars," in which the state employed extrajudicial violence to halt leftist or communist "subversion." These responses by police, military, and paramilitary groups left hundreds of thousands of civilians dead. Reports from large-scale investigations called truth commissions, first-person testimonies, fiction, and films underscore the employment of technology in these conflicts—electrical torture, the destruction of electrical towers, foreign-made weapons and vehicles, and seizures of media stations and newspapers. The seminar emphasizes the history of technology in human rights violations more broadly, from the 1994 Rwandan genocide to the United States' responses to extremism after 9/11. For longer description and instructor bio, visit societyhumanities.as.cornell.edu/courses.
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STS 6902 : Environmental Humanities: Theories and Methods
Crosslisted as: COML 4902, COML 6902, STS 4902 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Anindita Banerjee
The environmental humanities pose a radically different set of questions to texts, materials, and contexts that were previously approached in terms of human intentions and actions alone. This seminar explores the theoretical and methodological potentials of this rapidly emerging and constantly evolving field from the interdisciplinary, comparative perspective that it also axiomatically demands. Together we will discuss seminal works that tackle four foundational concepts imperative for reframing the traditional concerns of the humanities under the sign of anthropogenic planetary change -- scale, form, matter/ energy, and distribution. The seminar will develop ways to configure these focal points to the theoretical and practical concerns of various disciplinary approaches and, especially, to participants' individual interests and research projects.
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STS 6991 : Graduate Independent Study
Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Peter Dear
Stephen Hilgartner
Ronald Kline
Christine Leuenberger
Bruce Lewenstein
Michael Lynch
Trevor Pinch
Rachel Prentice
Sara Pritchard
Margaret Rossiter
Phoebe Sengers
Suman Seth
Applications and information are available in 303 Morrill Hall.
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STS 7111 : Introduction to Science and Technology Studies
Crosslisted as: HIST 7110 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Jessica Ratcliff
Rebecca Slayton
Provides students with a foundation in the field of science and technology studies. Using classic works as well as contemporary exemplars, seminar participants chart the terrain of this new field. Topics for discussion include, but are not limited to, historiography of science and technology and their relation to social studies of science and technology, laboratory studies, intellectual property, science and the state, the role of instruments, fieldwork, politics and technical knowledge, philosophy of science, sociological studies of science and technology, and popularization.
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STS 7937 : Proseminar in Peace Studies
Crosslisted as: GOVT 7937, HIST 7937 Semester offered: Fall 2019 Instructor:
Rebecca Slayton
The Proseminar in Peace Studies offers a multidisciplinary review of issues related to peace and conflict at the graduate level. The course is led by the director of the Judith Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies and is based on the Institute's weekly seminar series, featuring outside visitors and Cornell faculty. 
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